Review: Little Black Lies by Sharon Bolton

Little Black Lies - S.J. Bolton


I received a free copy of Little Black Lies from the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

Little Black Lies is a story told in three parts, each part telling the same story from a different viewpoint. The book has many great characters but it revolves around the characters of Catrin, Rachel and Callum. Each character is well rounded and complex and I did enjoy experiencing the story from each point of view. However, I began to get a bit fed up when it came to how much the author described the setting, environment and such.

 

The story is set in the Falkland Islands and the author initially does a wonderful job setting the scene with the descriptions of the harsh landscape, the wildlife and so on, and when reading the first section, Catrins viewpoint, I was happy to read about the scenery etc. But on reaching Rachels and Callums viewpoints I felt like it was repeated all over again. I found myself skimming and then totally skipping the scene setting as it started to feel like filler, I had been there and read it already several times.

 

The further into the book I got, the lower my rating started to slip. I was initially enjoying it but by the time I got halfway through the second characters story I was skipping the sections I mentioned above regarding the scenery etc, and on reading Callums story, the third section, I found that I was losing interest and had to force myself not to just give up on finishing the book.

 

The last quarter of the book just totally killed it, it was a disaster. The whole three different confessions thing, in fact the whole situation in the police station had no credibility at all. It came across as some kind spoof rather than a serious situation, the case would have been laughed out of the courts. And that last paragraph, what the heck? That was the nail in the coffin for me.

 

Not one I would recommend.

 

 

Reviews also posted to my blog: Scarlet's Web
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